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GAELIC IN THE LANDSCAPE

At one time Gaelic was spoken over most of the territory of modern-day Scotland and its influence may be seen in the names given to settlements and physical features throughout the country, particularly in those areas (the Highlands and the Hebrides) where the language has historically been strongest. A basic understanding of some typical Gaelic place-name elements can do much to enhance time spent in these areas. Here I have listed a number of on-line resources which may be of interest in this regard.

A guide to Gaelic origins of place names in Britain (Ordnance Survey, 2005):
http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/docs/ebooks/guide-to-gaelic-origins-of-place-names.pdf

Gaelic in the Landscape (Scottish Natural Heritage) series:
North-West Highlands (2007)
http://www.snh.org.uk/pdfs/publications/gaelic/Gaelic%20in%20the%20landscape.pdf
Caithness & Sutherland (2010)
http://www.snh.org.uk/pdfs/publications/gaelic/GaelicNorseintheLandscape.pdf
Lochaber (2013)
http://www.snh.org.uk/pdfs/publications/gaelic/roughboundsoflochaber.pdf
Islay and Jura (2011)
http://www.snh.org.uk/pdfs/publications/gaelic/islay%20jura%20book.pdf
Strathaird Peninsula, Skye (2015)
http://www.snh.org.uk/pdfs/publications/gaelic/Gaelic%20in%20the%20landscape%20-%20Isle%20of%20Skye.pdf
Colonsay (2017)
http://www.snh.org.uk/pdfs/publications/Colonsay_Book.pdf

On-line digital archive of the classic text 'Place Names of Ross and Cromarty' (W. J. Watson, 1904):
https://archive.org/details/placenamesofross00watsuoft

List of Scottish place-names, compiled by Iain Mac an Tàilleir, 2003:
http://www.scottish.parliament.uk/Gaelic/placenamesA-B.pdf
http://www.scottish.parliament.uk/Gaelic/placenamesC-E.pdf
http://www.scottish.parliament.uk/Gaelic/placenamesF-J.pdf
http://www.scottish.parliament.uk/Gaelic/placenamesK-O.pdf
http://www.scottish.parliament.uk/Gaelic/placenamesP-Z.pdf

Ainmean-Àite na h-Alba ~ Gaelic Place-Names of Scotland:
http://www.gaelicplacenames.org/index.php